On SALE right now for just 38€ Buy Now

See the world in your language with Google Translate

The Google Translate app already lets you instantly visually translate printed text in seven languages. Just open the app, click on the camera, and point it at the text you need to translate—a street sign, ingredient list, instruction manual, dials on a washing machine. You’ll see the text transform live on your screen into the other language. No Internet connection or cell phone data needed.

Today, we’re updating the Google Translate app again—expanding instant visual translation to 20 more languages (for a total of 27!), and making real-time voice translations a lot faster and smoother—so even more people can experience the world in their language.

Instantly translate printed text in 27 languages

We started out with seven languages—English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish—and today we’re adding 20 more. You can now translate to and from English and Bulgarian, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Filipino, Finnish, Hungarian, Indonesian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Romanian, Slovak, Swedish, Turkish and Ukrainian. You can also do one-way translations from English to Hindi and Thai. (Or, try snapping a pic of the text you’d like translated—we have a total of 37 languages in camera mode.)

To try out the new languages, go to the Google Translate app, set “English” along with the language you’d like to translate, and click the camera button; you’ll be prompted to download a small (~2 MB) language pack for each.

Ready to see all of these languages in action?

And how exactly did we get so many new languages running on a device with no data connection? It’s all about convolutional neural networks (whew)—geek out on that over on our Research blog.

Have a natural, smoother conversation—even with a slower mobile network
In many emerging markets, slow mobile networks can make it challenging to access many online tools – so if you live in an area with unreliable mobile networks, our other update today is for you. In addition to instant visual translation, we’ve also improved our voice conversation mode (enabling real-time translation of conversations across 32 languages), so it’s even faster and more natural on slow networks.

When we launched Google+, we set out to help people discover, share and connect across Google like they do in real life. While we got certain things right, we made a few choices that, in hindsight, we’ve needed to rethink. So over the next few months, we’re going to be making some important changes. Here’s more about what you can expect:

A more focused Google+ experience
Google+ is quickly becoming a place where people engage around their shared interests, with the content and people who inspire them. In line with that focus, we’re continuing to add new features like Google+ Collections, where you can share and enjoy posts organized by the topics you care about. At the same time, we’ll also move some features that aren’t essential to an interest-based social experience out of Google+. For example, many elements of Google+ Photos have been moved into the new Google Photos app, and we’re well underway putting location sharing into Hangouts and other apps, where it really belongs. We think changes like these will lead to a more focused, more useful, more engaging Google+.

Using Google without a Google+ profile
People have told us that accessing all of their Google stuff with one account makes life a whole lot easier. But we’ve also heard that it doesn’t make sense for your Google+ profile to be your identity in all the other Google products you use.

So in the coming months, a Google Account will be all you’ll need to share content, communicate with contacts, create a YouTube channel and more, all across Google. YouTube will be one of the first products to make this change, and you can learn more on their blog. As always, your underlying Google Account won’t be searchable or followable, unlike public Google+ profiles. And for people who already created Google+ profiles but don’t plan to use Google+ itself, we’ll offer better options for managing and removing those public profiles.

You’ll see these changes roll out in stages over several months. While they won’t happen overnight, they’re right for Google’s users—both the people who are on Google+ every single day, and the people who aren’t.

Free Course

"Double Your Traffic in 30 days" + Secret Bonus

valued at $299

This amazing course will teach you, step by step, how to double if not triple your traffic over the next 30 days.

100% Privacy. We will never spam you!

Leave a Reply to Jeffry Ripley
Cancel reply

  1. I’ve noticed this and am already affected by it in the niche I work in; travel. Google is especially bad when it comes to flights, as they show a list of prices from airlines which are, more often than not, the correct prices but there is often quite a bit of lower prices available from online travel agents (which Google ignores) and superior technology out there (sites like Dohop) that can find cheaper flights.

    Showing a price for a flight quickly is not, in my mind at least, superior to a greater range of options including low flight prices that Google can’t show.

  2. That clearly shows they’re reading your drafts behind your back! Or maybe your thoughts. Fearing their stocks would plummet in the wake of your discoveries, they decided to rollback their villainous changes… halfway through your post.

    Not to self: Apply tinfoil hat without prejudice.

    1. Very well written article and other comments. This maybe a little off topic but on point about Google’s bias. I recently redesigned a website for a client a few days ago and announced it on my google plus page. As I always do I go and then search the key phrase for my client to get a baseline ranking to monitor rank movement and I was shocked to see my google plus post first page right after the paid ads.

      No great content, no educational information, nothing special about my post. He is a wedding photographer in San Diego and after searching that phrase my google plus post beat out almost all legitimate listings. If that is not bias I’m not sure what is.

  3. Talk about a thought-provoking post. Many of us have noticed the ways in which Google is playing loose with the rules as regards images, content and such. I’ve often choose to think it’s simply a test or the company attempting to provide users with the best results possible.

    However, as you make clear with the image examples, not crediting the source–or, worse yet, crediting themselves as the source when the content is not owned by the search giant–seems quite a distance beyond misleading.

  • Jeffrey Zack www.envaios.com

    I've noticed this and am already affected by it in the niche I work in; travel. Google is especially bad when it comes to flights, as they show a list of prices from airlines which are, more often than not, the correct prices but there is often quite a bit of lower prices available from online travel agents (which Google ignores) and superior technology out there (sites like Dohop) that can find cheaper flights.Showing a price for a flight quickly is not, in my mind at least, superior to a greater range of options including low flight prices that Google can't show.
    UpVote Reply 11 Upvotes
  • Jeffry Ripley

    That clearly shows they're reading your drafts behind your back! Or maybe your thoughts. Fearing their stocks would plummet in the wake of your discoveries, they decided to rollback their villainous changes... halfway through your post.Not to self: Apply tinfoil hat without prejudice.
    UpVote Reply 12 Upvotes
    • Jeffrey Zack www.envaios.com

      Very well written article and other comments. This maybe a little off topic but on point about Google's bias. I recently redesigned a website for a client a few days ago and announced it on my google plus page. As I always do I go and then search the key phrase for my client to get a baseline ranking to monitor rank movement and I was shocked to see my google plus post first page right after the paid ads.No great content, no educational information, nothing special about my post. He is a wedding photographer in San Diego and after searching that phrase my google plus post beat out almost all legitimate listings. If that is not bias I'm not sure what is.
      UpVote Reply 12 Upvotes
  • Kory Giffard

    Talk about a thought-provoking post. Many of us have noticed the ways in which Google is playing loose with the rules as regards images, content and such. I've often choose to think it's simply a test or the company attempting to provide users with the best results possible.However, as you make clear with the image examples, not crediting the source--or, worse yet, crediting themselves as the source when the content is not owned by the search giant--seems quite a distance beyond misleading.
    UpVote Reply 19 Upvotes
1 More Comments